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Napoli

Travel

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I've quickly jetted off to Naples with my bestest friend Lea who gifted me this trip for my birthday. It's Italian style loud and very beautiful with countless small alleyways that lead you to intimate, real-life television scenarios of everyday life. You'll pass a woman, leaning out her kitchen window gesticulating and speaking loudly with her friend while the radio is blasting out pop music that hasn't made it into the charts abroad.

We're staying with a bunch of Italians that have a flat overlooking the entire city all the way to the Island of Capri and we were welcomed with a cooking orgy of pulpo and local fish. The smell of the ocean is mixed with the neverending sound of honking horns and barking dogs. The crumbling walls and uneven pavements are the epitome of historic charm and around each corner is an exceptionally well dressed grandpa. Every time I travel I am dumbfounded by how different all the cities and places in the world are to each other. With that in mind, Napoli I love you!

Cambodia Unpublished

Travel

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I completely forgot to post my final pictures of Cambodia! It was only two months ago that I was there but time is just running away like a madwoman. That saying too much to do, so little time seems more appropriate the older I get. When I'm 50 I'll be blinking once and the day will already have passed. I love those moments when you discover photos that you completely forgot you took and all the sensory memories come back like it was yesterday. I still remember the sticky heat, the dusty streets, the unpaved roads and the demure and wonderfully hospital people. I hope it's not the last time I get to visit this little but magnificent country.

អង្គរវត្ត

Travel

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From tuk tuks to huge chunks of ice drifting down the Spree: I'm finally back in Berlin (after another quick jaunt to the Baltic Sea) and Cambodia and Thailand already seem like a hazy, 30 degree dream. Mangos and papaya for breakfast, excessive hammock lounging and petting of stray dogs as well as finally being reunited with a large part of my family are blissful memories that I won't be forgetting any time soon. Here is the final part of my Angkor Wat pictures. Up next are my remaining snippets of Cambodia in all its melancholic beauty and of course I'll be squeezing myself into my usual attire that doesn't just consist of one pair of sandals and baggy cotton trousers. 

The Melancholy of Phnom Penh

Travel

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Our journey began in Phnom Penh and immediately on arrival I felt the lighthearted ease that is present throughout the entire country mixed with a dose of lingering melancholy. I love the varying atmospheres that you can almost taste when you travel to different places. The people and their culture give each destination its unique feel. Cambodia may have many similarities with Thailand from the language basis to the architecture and the food, but at its core it is a much different experience just like India is radically different to Singapore. With no road surface markings or traffic lights, our tuk tuk driver honked and and wove his way through a sea of mopeds, tuk tuks and cars to our hotel that looked out right over the Mekong river.

Phnom Penh's face is weathered, leathery, dusty, and marked with the scars that Pol Pot left behind with his unspeakable, genocidal crimes against his own people. Although this residual melancholy is omnispresent, Cambodian's have left this black part of their history behind, at times even to the point where for them the lines of reality and nightmare become blurred. Their positive outlook and earnest friendliness which plays over their faces, crinkling with laughter, makes you want to hug each and every one of them. 

In Phnom Penh two of the destinations were of course the Royal Palace with its beautiful gardens, glimmering, golden roofs and intricately carved stupas, as well as the Killing Fields memorial, which left my eyes bright red when I left. Listening to the stories, seeing the now tranquil lake and field that used to initially serve as a Chinese cemetary, later to be turned into a genocidal playground for Pol Pot, left a bottomless hole in my heart. 

After three days in Phnom Penh we drove cross country to Siem Reap, stopping quickly in the city of Skuon where local delicacies are fried, hairy spiders, scorpions and snakes (I couldn't bring myself to try any of these!). I'll be whisking you away to beautiful Siem Reap and Angkor Wat in my next post! Sending you lots of love from Chiang Mai until then.

Cambodia

Travel

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Multi-fasceted, beautiful, heart wrenching - Cambodia is one of the most fascinating countries I have ever visited. With less than 15 million inhabitants it's unbelievable what extremes you are faced with here starting with it's history including the heights of early civilisation to the unspeakable genocide under Pol Pot. You are faced with extreme poverty and destitution yet around the corner you suddenly see a stately house of a wealthy Cambodian. Stray dogs are obviously en masse as well as happy young children that you see in almost every doorway playing with their siblings, sugar canes or stray cats. Where Germany's population is predominantly older, Cambodia's life expectancy is only a meager 62 and although most people here live an unbelievably tough life comprised of 12 hour working days or longer, 7 days a week with no holidays, there is laughter and smiling faces everywhere. Family is at the epicentre and the wonderfully courteous general code of conduct and the helpfulness of the Cambodians has made me fall pretty hard for this small country. So these photos are a sort of love letter and I'm not finished writing it yet.